A Brain New Way To Work

Eve Abbott

Archive for March, 2010

Six Tips for Success at Work with Less Stress: brain-unfriendly words to avoid using

Our brain’s top priorities include survival of our self, our family and our job. That is why the basis of every human transaction is “What’s in it for me?” To enhance your performance for better results, here are six words to avoid using with your colleagues, clients and everyone else too.

1. No
Humans hate to hear ‘no’ (brain MRIs shift to stress patterns). Humans love to hear ‘yes’ (brain MRIs light up in an instant). So, if you are about to say no to someone: Stop. Think what it would take to say yes to their request. Especially if you both can work together for a win-win outcome! Make things happen instead of spending your energy on all the reasons you can not.

2. Don’t
The human brain always processes a negative in language by defaulting to the positive. When you say, “Don’t judge a product by brand alone,” what they really hear after not processing the negative is, “Judge a product by brand alone.” Communicate positively, by telling everyone what you want them to do, not what you don’t want them to do.

3. Can’t
Speaking of ‘don’t’, can’t  is another word that can frustrate or outright anger anyone from your boss to your spouse. When people process “I can’t”, they hear, “I choose not to.” Instead of focusing on what you can’t do, focus on what you can do.

4. But
As soon as you say the word ‘but’ your listener deletes the previous words spoken. For example, “You did good work, but…”) Now they are waiting to hear what you are really going to tell them. Replace but with either the word ‘and’ or start a new sentence. For example:

“You did good work and I wish your bonus was bigger.”

“You did good work. Unfortunately, the bonus pool last year was less than before.”

5. Honestly
When your listener hears you say, ‘honestly,’ you imply to them that some (or all!) of everything else you’ve said has not been honest. Delete these next two words from your vocabulary for the same reason: frankly, truthfully. I use the words, In fact but only when I have a relevant fact or new information to share.

6.  If

If always implies the opposite, “if not” as your brain processes language. When is a more definite word for the brain; it knows how to use when easily. For example:

“If you want to enhance your performance, here are six words you will be more successful by not using.”

When you want to enhance your performance, here are six words you will be more successful by not using.”

 Changing these words is guaranteed to get you better results at work and in life!

Excerpted: A Brain New Way to Work: Using your brain at work for better results and less stress. Copyright 2010 Eve Abbott All rights reserved.

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7 Easy Optimizing Your Computing Tips

The secret to optimizing your productivity and keeping your team organized is the same as the answer to “How do you eat a computer?”  The answer is “One byte at a time!”

With software applications taking up increasing amounts of hard drive space and people using multiple applications simultaneously, it is easier than ever to  have your work crawling along slowly.

BACKUP BACKUP BACKUP: Backing up your work on a regular basis gives you the security of knowing that even if you do toss something before its time – you can retrieve it. Make sure IT actually has backups of your system.

This makes optimizing your computing  a worry free activity. You may be amazed at how much you never refer to again.

Remember, 80 percent of what we e-file never gets referred to again!

7 Optimizing  Your Computing Tips:

  1. Put an underscore (_) in front of any folder and an exclamation point (!) in front of any file name that you use most frequently.
  2. Review temporary (.tmp) files before deleting.
  3. Back up large unused files (or when finishing a project) onto media of choice (Memory stick, CD, DVD, External hard drive).
  4. Make an Archive folder in each major directory and/or in each major folder for outdated files and compress these folders.
  5. Empty the recycle bin.
  6. In Explore, Windows, Delete all files in Temp folder.
  7. At Start Pearl, select Explore, Search (magnifying glass icon), Files or Folders, Key in .tmp, Do a FIND ALL and  delete.

Your computer will thank you and run faster. Your team will thank you and run smoother. Any executive will thank themselves for being so smart as to use my easy brain-based performance tips to save time and overcome overload!

Excerpts from: “A Brain New Way to Work: Using your brain at work for better results with less stress” Copyright 2010 Eve Abbott All rights reserved.

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If not, why not? What a great tool to boost your productivity and give your brain the best opportunity to help you work at your personal best. If you can’t close your office door for privacy while you exercise, you can even do it a bathroom stall!

Plus, it’s useful for any kind of brain fog or dullness, and for promoting emotional stability. It has been demonstrated to improve memory and focus in children, adults and elders.

Instructions on how to do this 3-minute simple exercise:

  • Standing with your feet pointing straight ahead, spread them apart about shoulder width.
  • Gently grab your right earlobe with the thumb and finger of your left hand.
  • Cross over your left arm and do the same using your right hand on the left earlobe.
  • Then squat as fully as you can comfortably, while breathing in.

(Inhaling as you squat may seem counter intuitive, but that’s what works.)

  • Then breathe out as you stand upright.

(Your breathing needs to be synchronized with the squats.)

  • Continue to repeat this movement/breath cycle while holding both earlobes for three minutes.

That may be too much at first, so start with one minute. One can go up to five minutes, but three is enough to produce results. This can be done by anyone at any age and is recommended on a daily basis until the brain fog lifts.

How It Works: Los Angeles physician Dr. Eric Robins says that the brain cells and neurons (connectors) are energized with this simple exercise.  It seems that combining a mildly aerobic exercise also helps flood the brain cells with oxygen. He prescribes it to his patients and has had excellent results.

According to Yale neurobiologist Dr. Eugenius Ang, the earlobes are acupuncture points that stimulate neural pathways in the brain. Using opposite hands for gently pinching the earlobes creates activity on both sides of the brain’s hemispheres simultaneously.

Ang showed the results from EEG (electroencephalography) readings after doing this exercise indicate that the right and left hemispheres of the brain had become synchronized. (EEG readings measure the neuron firings in the brain via electrodes on the scalp.) Dr. Ang also does this exercise daily in the morning and when he feels tired.

 How It Started: This easy and inexpensive way to improve memory, mental clarity and focus was introduced by pranic (breathing) yoga Master Koa Chok Sui’s book SuperBrain Yoga and taught by him personally on lecture tours.

It was also featured in a Los Angeles CBS News report that had an MD, a Yale neurobiologist, an occupational therapist, educators, and parents endorsing it.

 What have you got to lose? Just three minutes for mental clarity, improved focus and emotional resilience!

Information originated from

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